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AQL Calculator Acceptable Quality Limit

Widely adopted international standard ISO2859-1

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Even though the AQL chart and AQL table can help you breakdown the numbers, you will need an AQL calculator to get the numbers quickly and enhance accuracy. The AQL calculator is a simple and highly convenient tool to calculate the required sample size quickly. You only need to input your lot size, inspection level, inspection type, and limits. The calculator will provide you with an accurate sample size according to the AQL standard. Using the AQL calculator is an effective way to streamline your AQL sampling process.

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At Tetra Inspection, we are dedicated to helping importers, suppliers, and manufacturers to access the insight, services, and tools they need to streamline AQL sampling and inspection. You can rely on our AQL calculator to determine your AQL sample size for inspection. Tetra AQL calculator is robust, accurate, and also allows you to determine the number of tolerated defects by selecting the appropriate AQL Level. It is easy, simple, and accurate.

AQL

How is AQL applied in practice?

As an importer, even though the ideal acceptable quality level is zero-defect products, you may have to settle for acceptable quality. AQL will help you monitor and avoid batches with unsatisfactory quality levels. If you and your supplier settle on AQL of 1%, the number of defects in the batch from the supplier should not exceed 1%. So, only 10 products can be defective in a batch composed of 1000 products. The importer rejects the entire batch if the number of defective products is 11 or more. The defective products over and above the predetermined number or percentage are known as Rejectable Quality Limit (RQL). RQL is an unsatisfactory quality level.
If the quality level falls somewhere between AQL and RQL, it is known as Indifference Quality Level (IQL). It is important to note that AQL is not constant across all industries. For instance, AQL for healthcare products is more stringent since any defects pose a higher risk to the end-user. Some companies use different settings based on AQL defects. AQL defects are quality issues highlighted during random inspections. They are categorized into three groups:

Once an AQL standard is agreed on, it will be used as a reference during pre-shipment inspections. To determine the acceptable percentage for each type of defect in shipment.

Critical defects

These are serious defects that can harm the end-user severely. Importers usually use AQL of 0.0 for critical defects. If inspectors find a single.

Major defects

These defects are less serious but are not acceptable by the end-users since they increase the risk of product failure. Importers typically assign.

Minor defects

They are small defects with a low impact on safety and the usability of the product. Most importers use the AQL standard of 4% for minor defects.

Critical Defects

Critical defects are the most serious defect category under the AQL table. Importers typically use a 0 tolerance policy for critical defects (AQL of 0.0).

The criteria for defining a critical defect are:

Example of critical defects:

AQL Calculator

Major Defects

Less serious than critical defects, major defects are usually accepted in limited quantities. Typically, importers will assign the AQL standard limit.

The criteria for defining a Major defect are:

Example of critical defects:

AQL Calculator

Minor Defects

Less serious than critical defects, major defects are usually accepted in limited quantities. Typically, importers will assign the AQL standard limit.

The criteria for defining a Major defect are:

Example of critical defects:

What's an AQL Table?

Acceptable Quality Limit table refers to the ANSI ASQ Z1.4 table used by QC inspections professionals for AQL sampling during the inspection. This AQL sampling plan is designed to help in determining the right sample size for inspection and the acceptable number of defects. Insight into the dynamics of the AQL table can also enhance your understanding.

What's an AQL Table?

Acceptable Quality Limit table refers to the ANSI ASQ Z1.4 table used by QC inspections professionals for AQL sampling during the inspection. This AQL sampling plan is designed to help in determining the right sample size for inspection and the acceptable number of defects. Insight into the dynamics of the AQL table can also enhance your understanding.
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AQL stands for “Acceptance Quality Limit” and indicates the percentage of defective units compared to the total units in a batch, order, or shipment. In ISO 2859-1, AQL is defined as the “quality level that is the worst tolerable.” It is an important statistical tool for quality control that leverages the capabilities of the Six Sigma methodology developed by Motorola. Quality control professionals can help importers doing business with manufactures and suppliers overseas to conduct pre-shipment inspections. The inspector checks for quality issues related to performance, usability, functionality, and aesthetics by inspecting a sample of the entire shipment. An inspection certificate is issued to certify that products meet the quality levels.

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